KLAUS WANKER

PaintingS

Melancholic Zones

Melancholic Zones

Schneemanns_Rache_I

»Schneemanns Rache I (dekonstruiert)«

50 x 40 x 12 cm

2022

Bitumen paint, grasses, lime on canvas
Bitumenlack, Gräser, Kalk auf Leinwand

Schneemanns_Rache_II

»Schneemanns Rache I (dekonstruiert)«

50 x 40 x 12 cm

2022

Bitumen paint, grasses, lime on canvas
Bitumenlack, Gräser, Kalk auf Leinwand

EXHIBITIONS

TEXTS

Melancholic Zones

Melancholic Zones

On the series Contaminated Memories by Klaus Wanker

Katharina Manojlovic

E

A myriad of small wooden pieces protrudes from a tarry ­surface, reminiscent of an oil film, yet recalling at the same time distant cratered landscapes, whose colour appears by turns a glossy black and matt grey according to the perspective. Upon closer inspection, they are revealed to be short pieces cut from dried grass stems. Their arrangement conjures various associations: a model of a peculiarly decimated forest—shorn off trunks without branches or canopy, high-rise seas in lagoon country, the cross-section of a movement. Or a formation of bright spots against a dark background, analogous to those night-time exposures taken from the International Space Station, orbiting at more than 200 miles above Earth, which show man-made infrastructures as a diffused, lichenous, luminous network.

Klaus Wanker’s most recent series of works, like earlier pieces in his oeuvre, is positioned between abstraction and objectivity. Under the title Contaminated Memories (2020 / 21), organic structures are translated into simplified, geometrically constructed regimes, which evoke fantastical-dystopian landscapes. Model worlds that simultaneously hint at larger spaces, representing micro- and macrocosms in equal measure. A dynamic is produced by the oscillation between Wanker’s simplified use of forms and the imaginary, enigmatic quality of the images, which incite notions of eschatological worlds, of landscapes as ruinous, lost zones. As with Wanker’s installation Isle of the Blessed (GIER, 2019) they awaken in us memories of scenes that we know from cinematic apocalypses, namely in the science fiction genre, which tell of the search for alternative, new worlds in the face of an increasingly inhospitable Earth. In such stories, it is often mankind itself whose activities have led to catastrophe, to a loss of control, to apocalyptic circumstances without any prospect of renewal, and to a downfall from which nothing good will come—a scenario that became deeply inscribed in our collective consciousness during the twentieth century, not least by the experiences of atomic bombings and the threat of atomic warfare: for the first time, mankind appeared to have the power to annihilate the Earth and all of its inhabitants.

In light of contemporary climate debates, the focus has shifted to a vision of Armageddon that cannot be understood as a singular event, but rather as spanning generations and manifesting itself in a multitude of catastrophes—caused by mankind—subtly accruing, yet profoundly altering the planet on a global scale. Wanker’s works should also be seen in the context of these crises, and against the backdrop of current discourses around the concept of the “Anthropocene” as the designation for a new geological epoch, in which the human species has become an undeniable factor influencing the Earth’s ecosystems. His artistic project aims not least “to elucidate more clearly the transience and fragility of nature” (Wanker). In this way, the depiction or idealisation of nature is not the central concern, even though the artistic appropriation and conservation of natural materials resonates with the yearning for unspoilt nature and the desire to gain access to it. Instead, the melancholic gesture of these works tells us much more about the precarious relationship that we have with our environment.

The images in the series Contaminated Memories give an impression of natural colour thanks to the layered application of a paint made from diluted bitumen (lat. mineral pitch), a naturally occurring raw material obtained these days through the distillation of crude oil. The substance, already used in antiquity, has been produced industrially since the end of the nineteenth century and is employed in various contexts due to its properties as a water-resistant sealant, notably in the production of asphalt for road construction. In its artistic application, it gives the canvas an earth-coloured appearance and constitutes a very concrete, material reference to crude oil as the most important fossil fuel and finite resource, the extraction (and ever-increasing funding) of which makes our present form of existence possible and goes hand in hand with severe harm to climate and environment. In areas where it is applied undiluted, the bitumen paint appears black. In this way, the colour not only functions symbolically, but also contributes fundamentally to the construction of the image: light reflected by the dark areas sets the surface of the image in motion.

An essential precondition and component of Wanker’s artistic practice is the collection of natural materials, whose origins persist as a reference; alteration and deterioration are inscribed in them. The finished pieces thus represent snapshots of an extensive process, the beginning of which reaches far back in time before the act of painting. Wanker’s interaction with his environment and his aesthetic approach highlights (once again) the idea that natural phenomena first become evident in our perception, and in our confrontation with them we are thrown first and foremost back to ourselves. As Hartmut Böhme has said: “To the extent that human cultures learn to decipher the effects of the self in the phenomena of nature, just as, conversely, the effects of nature are recognised in cultural artefacts and dynamics—the opposition of culture and nature is dissolved.”

Questions of perception are central for Klaus Wanker, including the question of the dynamics and possibilities of expanding the medium of painting. Vision itself is a theme in his work, which seeks to explore the crossing points between two- and three-dimensionality. It is not only the grass stems, applied to the canvas using wax, which give the images their sculptural impression, but also their painted sides and unusual depth accentuate the work’s corporeality. The fact that they are unframed only serves to reinforce their referentiality to one another and to the space in which they are situated. The subtle outlines of the bitumen contrast with the contoured fields formed by the grasses on the surface of the image. They trace zigzag lines on the walls, as if they had migrated into the exhibition space, and the gaze follows them. The minimalist interventions by the American artist Fred Sandback (1943 – 2003), who used coloured threads and wires to create volumes without mass, are a reference point for this engagement with the relationship between artwork and space: weightless sculptures working through the space and making it perceptible.

The images are accompanied by a series of wax sculptures under the title ‘Spirits’: white wax castings of tree trunks from one and the same piece of trunk, not replicas but pale copies, anthropomorphic in appearance, alive in any case—or rather undead. Their artificial illumination in the space sharpens this impression, bringing to light what is already there: animated nature? The crossing of a frontier inheres within the idea of spiritual beings. They inhabit zones that lie between us and something other, appearing at once intimate and dangerous. Spirits have served since time immemorial as intermediary entities: what would they want to say to us?

Zur Werkserie Kontaminierte Erinnerung von Klaus Wanker

Katharina Manojlovic

D

Aus einer teerigen Fläche, die an einen Ölfilm denken lässt, zugleich an ferne Kraterlandschaften erinnert und deren Farbe, je nach Blickwinkel, glänzend schwarz, dann wieder matt-grau erscheint, ragen unzählige kleine Hölzchen. Bei näherer Betrachtung entpuppen sie sich als kurz geschnittene Teile getrockneter Grasstängel. Ihre Anordnung lässt unterschiedliche Assoziationen zu: Modell eines seltsam gerodeten Waldes – gekappte Stämme ohne Wipfel und Äste, Hochhausmeer auf Lagunenland, Schnittbild einer Bewegung. Oder Formation heller Punkte auf dunklem Grund, ähnlich jenen Nachtaufnahmen, die von der Internationalen Raumstation aus rund 350 Kilometer Höhe von der Erde angefertigt wurden und menschliche Infrastrukturen als flechtenartig sich ausbreitendes leuchtendes Netzwerk zeigen.

Klaus Wankers jüngste Werkserie siedelt, wie schon frühere Arbeiten in seinem Œuvre, zwischen Abstraktion und Gegenständlichkeit. Unter dem Titel Kontaminierte Erinnerung (2020 / 21) werden darin organische Strukturen in reduzierte Ordnungen überführt, die geometrisch konstruiert wirken und dabei fantastisch-dystopische Landschaften evozieren. Modellwelten, die zugleich auf größere Räume verweisen, Mikro- und Makrokosmen gleichermaßen darstellen. Eine Dynamik ergibt sich aus dem Oszillieren zwischen der reduzierten Formensprache und der imaginären, rätselhaften Qualität der Bilder, die Vorstellungen von endzeitlichen Welten provozieren, von Landschaften als ruinösen, verlorenen Zonen. Sie rufen, wie auch Wankers Installation Inseln der Seligen (GIER, 2019) Erinnerungen an Schauplätze in uns wach, wie wir sie aus filmischen Apokalypsen kennen, namentlich aus Science-Fiction-Szenarien, die von der Suche nach alternativen, neuen Welten angesichts einer zunehmend unwirtlich gewordenen Erde erzählen. Oft ist es in solchen Erzählungen der Mensch selbst, dessen Aktivitäten zur Katastrophe, zu einem Kontrollverlust geführt haben, zu apokalyptischen Zuständen ohne Aussicht auf Erneuerung und zu einem Untergang, auf den nichts Gutes mehr folgt – eine Vorstellung, die sich im 20. Jahrhundert nicht zuletzt durch die Erfahrungen der Atombombenabwürfe und eines drohenden Atomkriegs tief in unser kollektives Bewusstsein eingeschrieben hat: Erstmals scheint der Mensch in der Lage, die Erde und alles, was auf ihr lebt, zu vernichten.

Angesichts aktueller Klimadebatten hat sich der Fokus hin auf die Vision eines Weltuntergangs verschoben, der nicht mehr als singuläres Ereignis zu fassen ist, sondern Generationen überspannt und sich in einer Vielzahl von – menschlich verursachten – Katastrophen offenbart, die schleichend vonstatten gehen, den Planeten aber tiefgreifend und in globalem Ausmaß verändern. Wankers Arbeiten sind auch im Bewusstsein dieser Krisen zu sehen und vor dem Hintergrund aktueller Diskurse um den Begriff des „Anthropozäns“ als Epochenbezeichnung für ein neues geologisches Zeitalter, in dem die Spezies Mensch zu einem unleugbaren Einflussfaktor auf die Ökosysteme der Erde geworden ist. Sein künstlerisches Werk zielt nicht zuletzt darauf ab, „die Vergänglichkeit und […] Zerbrechlichkeit der Natur noch stärker zu verdeutlichen“ (Wanker). Dabei steht nicht deren Darstellung oder Idealisierung im Zentrum, wenngleich in der künstlerischen Aneignung und Konservierung natürlichen Materials auch die Sehnsucht nach einer noch unberührten Natur mitschwingen mag sowie der Wunsch, Zugang zu ihr zu finden. Der melancholische Gestus dieser Werke erzählt vielmehr vom prekären Verhältnis zu unserer Umwelt.

Ihre natürliche Farbanmutung verdanken die Bilder der Serie Kontaminierte Erinnerung dem schichtartigen Auftrag verdünnten Lacks aus Bitumen (lat. ­Erdpech), einem auch natürlich vorkommenden Rohstoff, der heute bei der Destillation von Rohöl gewonnen wird. Bereits in der Antike genutzt, wird Bitumen seit Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts industriell hergestellt und aufgrund seiner Eigenschaften als wasserunlösliches Dichtungsmaterial vielfältig eingesetzt, etwa im Straßenbau zur Herstellung von Asphalt. Sein künstlerischer Einsatz lässt die Leinwände erdfarben erscheinen und bildet einen ganz konkreten, materiellen Verweis auf Erdöl als wichtigstem fossilen Energieträger und endlicher Ressource, deren Gewinnung (und immer noch steigende Förderung) unsere gegenwärtige Daseinsform erst möglich macht und mit ­gravierenden Schädigungen von Klima und Umwelt einhergeht. Schwarz erscheint der Bitumenlack dort, wo er unverdünnt aufgetragen wurde. Dabei soll seine Farbe nicht bloß symbolisch wirken, sondern trägt maßgeblich zur Bildwerdung bei: Erst das von den dunklen Flächen reflektierte Licht versetzt die Bildfläche in Bewegung.

Eine wesentliche Voraussetzung und Teil der künstlerischen Praxis Wankers ist das Sammeln natürlicher Materialien, ­deren Ursprünge als Referenz bestehen bleiben; Veränderung und Verfall sind ihnen eingeschrieben. Die fertigen Arbeiten erweisen sich damit als Momentaufnahmen eines umfassenderen Prozesses, der seinen Anfang lange vor dem Akt des Malens genommen hat. Wankers Interaktion mit seiner Umwelt und seine ästhetische Herangehensweise machen (ein weiteres Mal) deutlich, dass natürliche Phänomene erst in unserer Wahrnehmung evident werden und wir in der Konfrontation mit ihnen zuallererst auf uns selbst zurückgeworfen sind. Mit Hartmut Böhme gesprochen: „[I]n dem Maße, wie in den Phänomenen der Natur die menschlichen Kulturen die Effekte ihrer selbst zu entziffern lernen, und im Maße, wie auch umgekehrt in den kulturellen Artefakten und Dynamiken solche der Natur erkannt werden – löst sich der Gegensatz von Kultur und Natur auf.“

Fragen der Wahrnehmung, auch im Sinne der Frage nach den Dynamiken und Erweiterungsmöglichkeiten des Mediums Malerei, sind für Klaus Wanker zentral. Das Sehen selbst ist Thema seines Werks, das Übergänge zwischen Zwei- und Dreidimensionalität auszuloten versucht. Nicht nur die mit Wachs auf die Leinwand applizierten Grasstängel verleihen den Bildern ihre skulpturale Anmutung, auch ihre bemalten Seitenflächen und besondere Tiefe heben die Körperhaftigkeit hervor. Dass sie ungerahmt sind, verstärkt ihre Bezogenheit aufeinander und den Raum, in dem sie sich befinden, zusätzlich. Mit den zarten Linien der Bitumenumrisse kontrastieren die sich auf den Bildflächen zu konturierten Feldern formierenden Gräser. An den Wänden ziehen sie Zickzacklinien, als wären sie in den Ausstellungsraum migriert, damit unser Blick ihnen folge. Ein Bezugspunkt für diese Auseinandersetzung mit dem Verhältnis von Kunstwerk und Raum bilden die minimalistischen Interventionen des amerikanischen Künstlers Fred Sandback (1943 – 2003), der aus farbigen Garnen und Draht Volumina ohne Masse erschuf: luftige Skulpturen, die den Raum durchwirken und sinnlich erfahrbar machen.

Zu den Bildern haben sich unter dem Titel „Geister“ eine Reihe von Ceroplastiken gesellt: weiße Wachsabgüsse von Baumstämmen, eigentlich von ein und demselben Stück Stamm, nicht Repliken, sondern bleiche Kopien, die anthropomorph anmuten, lebend jedenfalls – oder untot. Ihre künstliche Illuminierung im Raum mag diesen Eindruck noch verstärken, zum Leuchten bringen, was ohnehin da ist: beseelte Natur? Der Idee von Geistwesen wohnt eine Grenzüberschreitung inne. Sie bewohnen Zonen, die zwischen uns selbst und etwas anderem liegen, so vertraulich wie gefährlich erscheinen. Geister fungieren seit jeher als Mittlerinstanzen: Was sie uns gerne sagen würden?

BIOGRAPHY

CONTACT

Klaus Wanker

+43 699 17253897 

© Klaus Wanker